Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Sunday Selections # 92

Welcome back to Sunday Selections!

Originally begun by Kim of Frog Ponds Rock as a way to show off old photos that may be languishing unseen in your files, now continued by me and The Elephant's Child.

The rules are very simple;
1. post photos under the Sunday Selections title
2. link back to me, River, somewhere in your text
3. leave me a comment, so I know you've joined in

I usually have a theme to my Sunday Selections and this week, once again, I'm featuring trees.

In particular, the knobbly, the gnarly, the lumpy and bumpy tree trunks that fascinate me with their shapes and textures.

My favourites, the peppercorn trees, seem to be the knobbliest, the gnarliest.
All those knobbly protruberances, coupled with low branches, make these easy to climb.

Little hand and footholds everywhere.
I spent a lot of time in peppercorn trees as a child.

Put your foot down there, place your hand on the bump up there, haul yourself upwards....

Watch out for spiderwebs though.

Don't want to be disturbing the "homeowner".

Look at that base, almost like a chair.

Love this one! 

Even some gum trees have their warts!

For me, though, these would be a little too smooth and small for climbing with.
And there are no branches for resting on the way up.









14 comments:

  1. That last one looks like the walls they use for rock climbing.

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  2. I adore trees - and spent a lot of time in them as a child. These are simply beautiful. Mega thanks. (And thank you for linking to me).

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  3. Wait, peppercorn? As in, you can get those little ball things and grind them up and make real PEPPER?? Very cool trees.

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  4. Delores; it does! I hadn't realised that.

    Elephant's Child; I often used trees as my hiding place when playing hide and seek. I'd wear green and brown, take a book up into the branches and not be found for ages.

    gaby@727m2; I love them, trees are one of my favourite things.

    Happy Elf Mom; I'm not sure whether the aboriginals used them as spice in their foods, I know that today we don't, or at least I don't think so. It's possible they were named because the tiny berries LOOK like peppercorns, but now I'm going to have to check.

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  5. These trees are wonderful. My rock wall climbing grandson would be in climbing heaven.

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  6. Joanne; send him down. We'll teach him to eat footy pies'n'sauce too.

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  7. I've never seen so many knobby trees in one place before, must be something in the ground or the air.

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  8. We don't have peppercorn trees in WA unless they are planted but we do have weeping peppermints but no knobbly trunks. There is a local eucalyptus in our front garden though that has 'lumps' all over it and a huge bole that a carpenter would love to make one of those special tables from. No matter what the shape or size trees are just fabulous. To quote that silly song "I think that I shall never see a billboard lovely as a tree."

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  10. Windsmoke; they're not all in one place, unless you mean all in Adelaide. I must have walked miles yesterday!

    Mimsie; no peppercorns? I thought they were Australia wide. I'd like to see a photo of your weeping peppermints. I love trees and they certainly are better to look at than billboards.

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  11. I love that knobbly, rough texture! They're artworks in their own right, aren't they?!

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  12. Love it! Really appreciate you sharing the sights!

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