Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Sunday Selections # 315

Welcome back to Sunday Selections.

Begun way back in the mist of time by Kim of Frog Ponds Rock and now continued by me, with a drastic relaxation of rules.


Originally meant for showcasing old photos lost on your files, never seeing the light of day, the meme has morphed into photos of your choice, new or old, good or not-so-good, anything you please, but nothing rude please.


If you are participating, please leave me a comment so I can buzz along and have a look.
Elephant's Child always participates, and her pictures are always worth seeing, but EC is currently taking a break.


Wandering around:

 another block that once housed a home is being prepared for a new one, this is the third one between my driveway and the end of the street, a short two minute walk.

waiting for a bus, I snapped a few shots

of a brilliant white bank of cloud

as it disappeared over the hills.

someone has planted these two agaves(?) where the daisies used to be.

this one on the right, which has been kicked over and pulled out, twice, seems to be surviving quite well in spite of such rough treatment.

two baby buddleias planted where the Fejoia overhang used to be.

but what's this? The Fejoia stump is sprouting new growth! There's going to be a battle for space and sunshine a year from now.

I spotted this well established white geranium hiding behind the oleander.

I have my suspicions. It may be the one I had three years ago which mysteriously disappeared.
 Back then, so many things I planted on "her" side of the path just vanished and later showed up much closer to "her" flat. Well at least they're surviving.

Down the street a bit, next to the empty block, new neighbours in this house are caring for the once neglected garden and have the nectarine trees netted. The rainbow Lorikeets won't be happy.

Here you see all five of 'my' plum trees, they've grown quite a bit since I moved in, the top of the trees now reaches the roof of the upstairs flat. The plum crop was looking really good last December, the birds had left them alone and I was looking forward to plums. I didn't get a single one. Someone cleaned the trees completely while I was out one day. 😞

Finally, here is a neighbour's two metre spread of the same plant I featured last week. This is where I got the cutting from, with her permission of course. She also gave me the echeverias that are slowly taking over the spot I planted them.
 
 
 
 
 
 

21 comments:

  1. The white geranium in your post is like we have here.
    But they don't winter over, so most people brings them in.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora; winters here are mild so plants stay out all year, we have a Mediterranean climate.

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  2. My daughter commented on a pile of broken cement and the absence of the old mobile home when she came in today. The park is being rebuilt around me.

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    1. Joanne; you get the joy of watching new homes go up and people moving in.

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  3. There are good things and bad things about having neighbors so close.
    I have pecan trees - the crows flock in and get them every time, have never had a 'crop.'
    I'd rather have had the daisies ...

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    1. S.J.Qualls; daisies are hard to kill, they don't usually just "up and die" on their own and these weren't old at all, so I'd rather have kept them too.
      Close neighbours? I wish I had my own home with a fenced yard, instead of these open community grounds flats. I also wish I hadn't told certain newcomers that fruit on trees is available to anyone. Most people pick a few and leave some for others, but others see it as an opportunity to strip the trees. I hope they made jam or plum sauce, or at least shared the fruit with friends.

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  4. Do the agaves produce any flowers? Looks like a giant artichoke..

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    1. Grace; I've only ever seen one agave flower, they grow very tall and the bloom is lovely, but Lee below has more information than I do.

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  5. The Agave is native to Mexico and the hot, dry areas of Southern California etc., so it's a very hardy plant. It'll survive pretty rough treatment.

    In answer to Grace's question (I imagine you already know, though, River)....an agave plant only produces one flower...and it can take many years before it does so...and after flowering the plant dies. It's little wonder it take so long to produce a flower!!)

    I hope those who stole your plums choked on the seeds!! People! Arrrrrrggggg!!

    Have a great week, River...cuddles to Angel. :)

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    1. Lee; thanks for the information, I knew the plant took years to flower, but didn't know it died after that.
      Cuddling Angel is a whole new experience now that his coat is only a couple of millimetres long.

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  6. It is not nice to strip trees like that. Share! Though in my experience from childhood, plums from trees that looked like that were not so nice. I love the cloud photos. If you said it was a bushfire approaching, I would have believed you.

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    1. Andrew; most people here share, we take some fruit and leave for others. These plums are on the small side and there is only a week or two in December where they are ripe and sweet, usually the birds get a lot of them in the weeks leading up to ripeness. I could tell the clouds weren't bushfire smoke because of the stillness, they were drifting very slowly, a fire would show roiling and building clouds.

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  7. I'm sorry you were left plumless!!

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    1. fishducky; there's always next year, perhaps I'll tie a ribbon around one tree with a note to leave the fruit alone.

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  8. Your walk yields so many lovely and interesting photos. Mine would only yield leafless trees and dead grass. No signs of spring yet here. I did post Sunday Selections today.

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    1. Granny Annie; I'll pop over and see.

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  9. Lovely to see your selection of photo's.
    How rude of people to take your plums though ...

    Hope your weekend was good

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member; the thing is, these are community gardens and the fruit is available for all, but most of us take some and leave some for others. Until certain people moved in, no one stripped the trees.

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  10. It breaks my heart when neighbours are that awful. Once there was an "interesting" family that lived up the street from me. I saw one of them get out of their truck, walk up and shatter one of the yard sculptures I had by my tree. I said nothing because these were scary people. Drugs. Thankfully the bank thought they should leave our 'hood not too long after. What can ya do, right? I'm just glad they didn't pay their bills.

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    1. Happy Elf; the grounds here are communal, although several people including me have claimed the patch nearest their flat to plant what we want there. The tree were already here when I moved in, so they are part of the grounds and the fruit is for anybody, or the birds. No one, until now has stripped the trees like this, but really, they are allowed to take fruit. Perhaps next year they won't take it all.
      That family who shattered a sculpture were definitely in the wrong.

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  11. Sorry I am so late in visiting. I have been out of town this week.

    I always enjoy your pictures. Someone took all your plums???? How rude! Equally rude is the fact that plants would disappear.

    I was happy to read in your comments that most of your neighbors are good to share but that story from Scary Elf Mom makes me thankful that most people aren't that mean.

    I always love your pictures.

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