Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Sunday Selections # 405

Welcome back to Sunday Selections.

Begun way back in the mist of time by Kim of Frog Ponds Rock and now continued by me, with a drastic relaxation of rules.

Originally meant for showcasing old photos lost on your files, never seeing the light of day, the meme has morphed into photos of your choice, new or old, good or not-so-good, anything you please, but nothing rude please.

If you are participating, please leave me a comment so I can buzz along and have a look.
Elephant's Child always participates, and her pictures are always worth seeing.


Back in the garden again, a different type of aeonium, smaller and lighter than the black I showed you last week, which is also in this photo just on the left, the darker longer leaves. This area is almost entirely aeoniums

a cascade of green

my mint is doing very well, I must remember to pick and dry some before the earwigs get it

the hoya is recovering after being neglected most of the year, shiny new leaves popping out all over

the white geranium has been chewed by something, probably earwigs, they're quite plentiful this spring

my catmint is also doing well, in spite of the pot being home to an ant nest. I'm currently trying to dry some of this to fill my daughters catmint tube, for Missy to play with. Lola just gets fresh cut sprigs with the stems a little crushed to release the scent, she rolls around in it, rubs her face on it, chews it a bit.

I have a new windspinner, this one is plastic, the others were fabric stretched over wing shapes, I hope this one lasts a bit longer. Eventually, I'll save some $$ and get bigger metal ones. Little kids walking by with their grandma love these.

I planted some red yarrow, but haven't watered it enough, it's struggling a bit, but hanging in there

I also planted some dill, I love the scent of this on a hot summer day and eventually hope this spreads through the bare patches via self-seeding. it should bring plenty of bees.
Right now though, there is nothing to see, the feathery foliage has been eaten down to the ground by something, so I placed an empty soft drink bottle over where the roots are/were and I hope it will recover.

How's your garden growing?









27 comments:

  1. Catmint? I must see whether Jazz would like it. Catnip he treats with ignore.
    I have just planted tomatoes and they are going well. The herbs are thriving too. As is the rocket and perennial spinach.

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    1. Elephant's Child; I'm not sure what the difference is between catnip and catmint, I've never actually seen any catnip.
      I haven't grown a decent tomato in about twenty years. I don't eat many tomatoes anyway, so I just get a couple from the shops when I want them in salad.

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  2. My garden is boring especially compared to yours, I did have a successful tomato growing season, did not have to buy a tomato for 6 weeks.

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    1. joeh; I've got a patch of "survivors" which only gets watered once a week in summer and not at all in winter. I made plenty of mistakes in the first two years and what died didn't get a second chance.
      I'm glad your tomatoes did well this year.

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  3. Unlike you, I have a black thumb!!

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    1. fishducky; perhaps you're selecting plants that won't do well in your soil or area. Keep trying until you find something that survives, then plant more of that.

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  4. Always enjoy your garden photos...

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  5. It is kind of fun watching the Catmint work as an aphrodisiac on our cats.

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    1. Arkansas Patti; I enjoy watching Lola being happy rubbing her face in it. That lasts for about a half hour then she sleeps the rest of the day.

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  6. I have no need to plant dill...I'm a big enough one!

    My landlords' garden is vast and varied. I don't do any gardening these days.

    Have a great week, River...cuddles to the cuddly lovely Lady Lola. :)

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    1. Lee; I'm a bit of a dill myself, but I love the scent of it on a hot day and I know the flowers will bring the bees, so I'm hoping my tiny plant will recover. If not, I'll buy more, perhaps a packet of seeds and just toss them around out there.

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  7. Wind spinners are always interesting to the young, and not so young at times. I guess catmint is not catnip?

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    1. Andrew; according to several sources, catnip and catmint are not the same. I've never seen catnip, so I don't know, but Lola loves the catmint.

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  8. I came home today, and discovered Laura brought in the glass lady and the butterfly and upended the bowl of the bird bath. It isn't spring, summer or fall here, Dorothy! Thanks for the lovely pictures.

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    1. Joanne; I'm glad I could brighten your day. It's sad when the summer ornaments have to come inside because you know snow and ice isn't far off then.

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  9. What a garden! We inherited rose bushed when we moved here. I believe they and I have made peace, and they are doing well.

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    1. Susan Kane; I have trouble growing roses, I don't know why, I had several when I lived interstate and they did well, but here, not so good. I inherited tall prickly grasses when I moved here and had them all pulled out to be able to grow what you see here today. There are plenty of roses around here though, so I see them every day.

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  10. All is coming along nicely.
    Saw many of those windspinner's in one caravan park at Bowen.

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    1. Margaret-whiteangel; windspinners are popular pretty much everywhere.

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  11. Tree's are pretty bare here.
    Coffee is on

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    1. peppylady (Dora); you're into winter there now, put on some fluffy socks, light the fire and enjoy your coffee.

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  12. Nothing growing here except the neglected jade plant that sits on the end of the kitchen table. It's over 20 years old, and amazingly hard to kill!

    I like your red yarrow. Don't think I've ever seen that before. Unlike the dill, which my grandma grew, to use in her pickles.

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    1. Hillbilly Mom; jade is hard to kill and loves neglect, just toss it a bit of water now and again and your grandchildren can inherit it.
      I haven't seen red yarrow for a long time, so I had to buy this when I saw it at the local market. Most commonly yarrow here is the white variety and there is also yellow.

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  13. I didn't know that dill attracts bees - good to know. Your plants are doing well.

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