Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Whimsical Wednesday # 159

Welcome back to Whimsical Wednesday!

The day for your googled giggle that gets you over the hump that is Wednesday and sliding down into the weekend.

alright! alright!
I'll talk!! 
I'll tell you everything...
Please, just turn off the heat!

16 comments:

  1. I have noticed of late that Joanne is right. The eggs have been easy enough to crack but hard to peel. Despite their icy bath when the cooking is done.

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  2. Joanne; I hadn't thought of that one. :)

    Elephant's Child; eggs are harder to peel when they are older, I've heard. Try my method: tap the point sharply on the bench, turn over and tap the base sharply on the bench, lay egg on its side then roll firmly until shell is a web of cracks, then peel. Usually works.

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    1. That's what I do too......cool quickly under running water.tap..tap..roll and presto.

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    2. Delores; I saw my future brother in law doing it this way many years ago and have done it myself since then. I still get an occasional shell that won't peel, the inner membrane appears to be tougher in those.

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  3. I always add an amount of salt to the water, that also helps, particularly in keeping the shell from cracking when boiling, too. Also, after the cold water bath, putting them into the fridge does help too, if you have the time to do so.

    I could be wrong, EC...but I heard differently...the fresher the egg the harder to peel. It's been suggested that older eggs should be the ones used for boiling.

    Everyone has their own ways and methods, I guess.

    Happy mid-week, River. :)

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  4. My Drummy eggs are hard to boil her shells are not very hard but very hard to peel if i want hard boiled ones I buy them it been a while since I had them.
    merle...........,

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  5. Lee; I heard that adding a teaspoon of vinegar also prevents eggs from cracking, but it didn't work for me. Nor did salt. I'm wondering if the sudden expansion of egg from the heat is what cracks the shells. We'll never really know. I put the eggs in cold water and let them warm up as the water heats. That seems to work better to prevent cracking.

    Merle; try the tap and roll method, tap top then bottom, then roll, but roll firmly for a few seconds until the whole shell is well cracked. Perhaps Drummy's eggs have a good tough inner membrane because of her healthy diet.

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    1. Who knows, River? Whatever works, I guess. When I was cooking in restaurants, that's what I did...and by putting the hard-boiled eggs into the cold room for a while before peeling seemed to work.

      Also putting bicarb soda, instead of salt, into the water also helps in the non-cracking and peeling department, too.

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    2. You're right. Whatever works. Maybe it's the egg that decides. Just like people, chook children are all different, differences in shell construction according to diet and lifestyle must count for something.

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  6. At the dentist today the one chuckle was when the dentist said to her assistant: "I bet we could get her to tell us anything." I would have admitted to killing JFK at that point.

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  7. Okay children. I did a lot of actual RESEARCH on this, and then wrote a post about the unbelievably successful way to boil and shell eggs. You're welcome.

    http://littlelottajoy.blogspot.com/2014/11/instant-peel-boiled-eggs.html

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  8. Also by using room temp eggs rather than cold straight out of the fridge/cold room into boiling water helps.

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  9. lotta joy; last time I was at the dentist, she and her assistant were discussing the assistant's upcoming wedding and I expressed my opinions with thumbs up for good ideas. I have lots of anasthetic, but not enough that I can't concentrate.

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  10. lotta joy; I'll check that post in a minute.

    Lee; I use them straight from the fridge into cold water and they warm up as the water heats, as soon as it boils, three minutes is long enough for hard boiled, since they semi cook as they heat. I never do soft boiled eggs anymore.

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  11. lotta joy; I've read the article and now I want your recipe for the devilling of the yolks. And anyone else's recipe if they have one please. email me or put up a post about devilled eggs and what you put in the mix, I'll be happy either way.

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