History

and herstory: His-story and Her-story.

I get that most History is written about men and their deeds, but that's because way back in the dark ages women weren't allowed to read and write, weren't even taught to read and write. They weren't allowed to do much else either. 

Now, things have changed, for the better of course, and women are making their way into history books, but these will be the history books of the future, when generations to come will learn about us and the great things some of us did. 

But, yes of course there's a BUT, I don't think making all this fuss over HIS story and HER story is necessary or even correct. I know you are all going to shout me down, but I'm used to that. 

My point is that HISTORY is a TIME and therefore genderless.

Comments

  1. It depends utterly on what you are extracting from history.

    The victors in any war write it and determine erasure of people and yes, of sexes.

    There are multiple sides to every event.

    Women have been consistently erased from the recording of history, art, music, religion, innovation.

    I don't believe in the artificial social construct of the word "gender" as no one can define it apart from stereotypes. It is consistently conflated with the word "sex".

    Most will hate my comment.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
  2. History is about more than winners and losers. Much more. Women have been (and are) important contributors all along and I am interested in hearing their story. The phrase His Story/Her Story is a form of shorthand which I do agree with. I want to know the story from the perspective of those who are not/were not rich and powerful.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree with you, River, even though I searched for the origin of the word 'history' and found it was from the Greek, meaning older wise man. But I stand by your point - there are many words we don't need to change; it only distracts from the real issues.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Most history recording is bias in some form.
    Coffee is on

    ReplyDelete
  5. I've seen herstory written but never knew what it was about. Interesting to me is that our State Library at the moment has a bit of a focus on Australian history from a female perspective and not just the history that comes from the letters written by middle class and educated women, but the working woman, and the home making and child raising woman. I think the history of middle class women is covered well enough and even those on the street on the lowest rung, but not your just average woman of the past. But any history of the working class will nearly always be written by the middle class and therefore loaded. Ouch, my head hurts. You made me think!

    Yes, of course you are right. History is history is history, genderless.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Exactly. There are far too many people doing their best to start a 'tempest in the teapot' these days. Ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Herstory...I did not know there was such a thing. I think it is silly to put a gender on everything, but if people like it, I do not really care that much, there are so many important things in the word. I suppose if a person is unsure of their preferred gender, they would be part of mystery.

    ReplyDelete
  8. A good deal is riding here on point of view. Recently I said to my daughter, apropos her daughter, "Your daughter has more clothes than God." My daughter replied "God has one robe."
    I was able to contain my laughter, but when I tell the story to others, we laugh out loud.

    A great post.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Some of these words make my head want to explode. I don't have to call my mailman a mailwoman or mail lady to know she's female. One of my old college roommates used to call her the femailman. I don't think it makes much difference in the way she does her job. I'm all about women's accomplishments being told, but you don't have to call it HERstory for me.

    ReplyDelete
  10. His, her, matters not to me. I am secure in the knowledge that I am worthy and do not need a particular title t designate such.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I had no idea history was gender specific. I'm Ok with the way it is.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Never heard of that. History is history to me, doesn't matter who makes it - male or female.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I agree, River....I agree.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Agreed! There's far too much emphasis on gender.

    ReplyDelete
  15. History is somewhat like a pancake.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

a lizard in your home is lucky, right?

Words for Wednesday

Words for Wednesday