Wednesday's Words on a Friday

The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles. Sadly, Delores has now closed her blog forever due to other problems.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write. A story, a poem, whatever comes to mind.

If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along and read it.

This month the prompts are supplied by Lee and can be found here.

This week's words/prompts are: 
1. cliché 
2. eccentric 
3. paradise 
4. derogative 
5. capitulate 
6. judgment  

and/or:  

1. direction 
2. sacrifice 
3. dispensable 
4. consequence 
5. outlook 
6. principle 

Here is my story: 

When I first moved into my little subsidised housing unit, I felt a little lost. It was a much smaller place, with very little storage space, but in my previous home, my outlook had not been so good, with escalating rent, less working hours, so I thought I would get used to being here where the rent was low enough that I wouldn't have to worry so much anymore.

I soon settled in and used the closed in back porch as storage space with about 50% of my stuff packed away into plastic crates and kitchen things in the big old kitchen cabinet that also didn't fit into the matchbox sized kitchen. 
I arranged and rearranged furniture, alphabetised books and dvds, and it began to feel like home. Some of the neighbours were a little eccentric, but who was I to pass judgment? I probably am eccentric too. 

I'd seen stories on the TV news programs, several times, about the troubles in many sections of subsidised housing, where the neighbours fought with each other and trashed their homes, I'd heard the derogatory statements about dole bludgers and welfare bums, and in some cases that might be true, circumstances have a way of getting you down, but certainly not here, where most of my new neighbours were quiet, law abiding elderly people. 

I planted things in the little garden bed, bought some pots and planted those too. I thought maybe I had found a little piece of paradise. I was happy. 

Then things began to change. Older neighbours moved into nursing homes, newer younger people moved in. 
And they weren't all nice. 
Things began to happen. 
Pets went missing. 
Doors got slammed. 
Arguments and screams late at night, more than once police were called. 

Often now, there are pairs of police persons walking or driving through, just keeping an eye on things. I know what they are looking out for, but won't mention any of that here. 

Most recently, you've all read that my own little garden has been violated. 

The items stolen aren't valuable, easily replaced if I wish to do so, but the feeling of invasion is so strong, I'm feeling physically nauseous still and as a consequence, my garden is being torn apart. 

Some things I'd planned on removing anyway, so they have been pulled up and thrown out, but the remaining hanging ornaments and wind chimes have been removed from the trees, the standing/sitting ornaments have all been taken in and the empty pots have been brushed clean and stored away. 

I will sacrifice the garden for my peace of mind. 

If there's nothing there, nothing can be stolen. 

As time passes and this awful gut-stirring feeling eases, possibly I will replant, redecorate, but it won't be soon. 

My plans will take a new direction. I'm thinking about large, very prickly/thorny cactus plants. 
And a security camera, something that lights up and whoop-whoops when anyone steps past my boundary. 

Too much? Maybe...


**I've just noticed this is post number 2850, wonder if I can make 3000 by Christmas?**


Comments

  1. My usual silliness:

    To say Kevin is an eccentric man of wealth is just another cliché. Okay, yes, Kevin lived in paradise without fear of consequence or possessing any principles. He had inherited tons of money, giving him a positive outlook on his life although he had no idea that his actions made him totally dispensable. Kevin did not realize that locals considered him for the-total-eclipse-of-the-moon sacrifice. No judgment intended, but he had said many derogative insults, one ordering the local chieftain to capitulate. Oh, well. There would always be another wealthy person to execute.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Executing the wealthy is a change from the norm... So often the boot is on the other foot and the axe on the other head.

      Delete
    2. Susan Kane; I like this, and it's so true that those with inherited wealth often have no idea they are obnoxious.

      Delete
    3. A cautionary tale, probably for those who will not heed it.

      Delete
  2. My heart aches reading your story. I am impressed at the number of posts you have put up though. Very impressed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; thank you. Writing this one actually helped me deal with the feelings and I slept like a log last night.

      Delete
  3. I really feel for you, River. No one should have to put up with what you've been dealing with. And our use of the words explains your feelings of stress and strain.

    Hopefully, even in the smallest way, by expressing your feelings by the written word has helped alleviate some of that disquiet..."Words Have Power".

    Well done...take good care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee; thank you. As I said above to EC, writing it out has helped. I thought about several books I have read where someone writes down their problems then burns the paper and feels better, so I tried this way and it worked just as well.

      Delete
  4. I'm so pleased you wrote about your place and how it's changed and how it make you feel.
    It has made you feel much better I'm sure.
    Take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret D; thank you. It has changed a lot here since I moved in and not for the better. Too often police patrol the area and strange people who don't live here are seen going to and from several of the units often very early in the mornings or late in the evenings. I no longer feel as safe as I did.

      Delete
  5. I am so sorry you are living through this but am pleased that writing this has given you some solace. Hope the extra patrols also deter any more thefts.

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    Replies
    1. Arkansas Patti; There will be no more thefts from my garden since I removed everything that was left and have stored it all away, apart from a few pot plants that are fairly large and not easy to sneak away with.

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  6. I know the feeling you feel and it takes a bit to shake it but you will - in time. I applaud you for writing it out. I also applaud you for nearly 3000 posts! - I'm one of those people that writes it out and burns it too. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Magical Mystical Mimi; I replied here yesterday and it seems to have vanished. Thank you.

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  7. Maybe you sadly are right to abandon your garden - for a while.
    The screaming kids keep throwing their stuff on our little balcony. Well. We tried to be nice, now what´s gone is gone. Hubby thought of slicing that darn ball before giving it back even.
    So sad when you have dumbheads around. We have LOUD dumbheads, and summer is on the way...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Iris Flavia; yes, the garden will remain undecorated for quite a while. it looks so bare out there, but I'll get used to that.
      I found the best way to stop kids throwing things was to just take the things inside and pretend I never saw them. They soon learned not to throw things.

      Delete
    2. Maybe better than ripping them and throwing them back .Hubby might get in trouble with the parents of those "brats", LOL

      Delete
  8. It still makes me angry on your behalf that people do this to you where you live.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. messymimi; it never used to happen, only since the younger people began moving in, these are mostly people rescued from the streets of from abusive, violent environments and many have mental health problems, or drug/alcohol addictions.

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  9. One of my clients lives in subsidies housing and everyone seem to get long.

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    Replies
    1. Dora; I'm pleased to hear it. That's what it was like here when I first moved in nine years ago.

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  10. I'm sorry that this pleasure has been taken from you. I DO love the idea of prickly plants, and a whooping alarm!

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  11. Replied on my blog, but i'm saying it here, too. When i looked up the image of the flower on Google, i came up with flowering maple and Chinese lantern as other names, i hope that helps you, and i found it at an etsy shop

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/755174838/live-abutilon-flowering-maple-chinese

    ReplyDelete
  12. Glad to see the stories still going. The children and I lived in subsidized housing after my divorce in 1975. Lots of stories I could share from there. Thanks for commenting on my recent post.

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  13. Hi River,

    I really should have a go at this, myself.

    2850 posts? That's amazing. I'm still only at 780. I should post more often.

    :o)

    Cheers

    PM

    ReplyDelete

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