Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Wednesday's Words on a Friday

The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write. A story, a poem, whatever comes to mind.
If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along and read it.


This month the words are supplied by Elephant's Child and can be found here.


This week's words are:


1. tick
2. fresh
3. droplet
4. magnificent
5. juice
6. appeal

and/or:

1. clue
2. cancel
3. cheap
4. purple
5. whales
6. love

Here is my story:

We’d had kind of a rough beginning, born to poor working parents, never enough money or clothes, but at least our Dad didn’t get drunk and hit us, like Cheryl’s Dad did.  There was only Cheryl and her brother Simon, while there were eight of us kids, but we were the happier family.
Sometimes Cheryl’s Mum Joan would bring over cakes or biscuits she had made, saying there were too many for just her and the kids, “Dan doesn’t eat sweet things” she’d say and Mum was always thankful, but we all knew that Cheryl’s mum mostly came over for some company and the laughter that rang through our house daily.
As the years went by and we all grew up, and Cheryl’s Dad grew grumpier and harder to live with, Cheryl and her Mum came visiting more often, especially after Simon went off to live and work in another town.  Cheryl and I got jobs at the local towel factory, making bath towels in pretty colours; Cheryl was good on the machines while I was in the packing department.
Neither of us ever married although her brother Simon did and all of my siblings too. “We’ll just have to grow old together” she’d say.  And we did. We were the only two who stayed in the small town after all the parents died. Cheryl inherited their house, but chose to sell it and move into my happier, messier home with me.
In our fifties one day, saving for our eventual retirements, Cheryl brought home some travel brochures from a stand at the library. “Look at these Barbara,” she said. “What do you think? Could we take a little holiday away this year?” We studied all of them and discovered we both liked the idea of a Whale Cruise, four days at sea, leaving from a Port city several hours south of where we lived. “Do you get seasick?” I asked. “Haven’t a clue,” Cheryl replied. “Let’s find out,” I said. “I don’t know about myself either, neither of us have been anywhere near a beach our whole lives. Let’s cancel the caravan this year and try this cruise instead.”
With the travel brochure highlighting the cheap cruise managing to tick all the boxes for us, off we went, enjoying the fresh sea air, sipping orange juice each morning, marvelling at the magnificent views, the purple shadows on the icebergs in the evenings, catching sight of whales now and again. Neither of us were seasick and we loved every minute, even the few droplets of rain that fell the last evening. The whole trip had so much appeal for us, we did it again the next year.

20 comments:

  1. How lovely the two friends are spending their golden years together.

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    1. Only slightly confused; they've been buddies their whole lives and get on well, so why not? Companionship rules.

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  2. Replies
    1. fishducky; thank you. The words just didn't suggest any darkness this week, happy happy all round.

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  3. This is lovely. And whale watching sounds like a perfect new tradition to establish (and I do get seasick).

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    1. Elephant's Child; Thank you. I'm sorry to hear you get seasick, were you okay on your Antarctic trip?

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    2. I was appallingly sick. One day it took four injections to stop me vomiting. And it didn't matter.

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  4. Great way for two friends to continue friendship into their golden years.

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    1. Susan Kane; they're so alike they could be twin sisters.

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  5. A happy completion to what began as a sad story.

    Well done, River. :)

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    Replies
    1. Lee; thank you; nothing too sad there really, just a man who believed in a smack when kids did wrong, as he'd got when a child. Nothing as bad as beating them black and blue.

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  6. Would you ever consider writing a book, or, have you ever written one?

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    1. The Happy Whisk; I have considered and actually have a couple of stories that have reached about fifteen chapters, but I don't seem to be able to move them along. Yet.

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  7. That is the sweetest story, loved it.

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  8. Ooh! Like Laverne and Shirley, but working in a towel factory instead of a brewery. And not in Milwaukee. Without Lenny and Squiggy living upstairs. And no Mrs. Babish as the landlady. Not getting into madcap predicaments.

    Okay. It's nothing like Laverne and Shirley. But it makes me want to know more about their lives.

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    1. Val; I've seen Laverne and Shirley and they weren't the inspiration for this at all. These two are just happy being companions and aunties to several nieces and nephews.

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  9. I love happy endings and this story had just that.

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    1. Arkansas Patti; I'm a big fan of happy endings myself.

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  10. It's not a fairy tale ending, it's a realistic happy ending, and i like it very much!

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