Copied from today's newspaper: Advertiser, 14/4/21

 On the Letters to the editor page, also known as "Have your say", written by "Janine"

( I don't know her and hope she doesn't mind me spreading the word further)

"The vaccine should be managed on a national basis as in the UK. Yesterday they started texting and sending letters to the 40-49 age bracket with appointment times and location - and they have more than 68 million people. Australia could have done the same thing using Medicare registrations; sending out appointments from the oldest down. Leaving it to people to phone all over the place hoping to get an appointment is ridiculous. No organisation whatsoever here and we've a lot fewer people to manage."


People of Australia, do you agree this is a good way to do the vaccinations? 

If yes, perhaps you could forward "Janine's" words to your local MPs.

Comments

  1. Probably would not go over well in the US. Some people here would not go simply because they were told to go, others would be annoyed at not having a scheduling say do to work or other factors...missed appointments would delay vaccinations. But that is just the US, different cultures different results.

    Here every state has done it a little differently. Mostly it has been working but not without some frustration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. joeh; I've been reading about your country and the shemozzle as people try phoning multiple places trying to get appointments, even as far as out of their state or city.
      One problem we have is there just aren't enough doses here in Australia.

      Delete
  2. I'm not in Australia, but I'll put in my two cents! That approach seems to make sense. More organized, and then it's a person's own fault if they don't show up for their appointment. Those who really want it could get their shot without a struggle.

    Here in Missouri, the city people were driving 3 hours to the rural areas to get their shots, after getting on 10-12 lists with hopes of being notified. They ended up going to mass vaccination events, and most likely didn't take themselves off all those other lists. Which were then too full for people still trying to find an appointment to schedule one.

    OLD PEOPLE who were in the proper age group for the first vaccines did not know how to navigate the electronical thingamajigs to get themselves signed up (according to comments online; I don't know anyone personally like that). Many had to rely on family members doing it for them, or neighbors. It was kind of a mess. Now they are taking walk-ins of any age over 16 or 18, and seem to have doses left over. I think that may be because people in those areas already drove far away to get their shots. And some people don't want one, and some have already recovered from having the virus itself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Val; I know a few older people here who don't have a clue about the internet, also a few older people who have acquired i-pads and learned to use them, so there are enough of us around to help any older people who ask for help. Most here would go to their doctor to find information anyway.
      It concerns me that so many people in your country are on multiple waiting lists taking up spaces that are needed by others.
      My daughter had her first dose of Pfizer yesterday, she works in a major hospital, so she's eligible long before I am. The rest of us are still being careful, staying away from crowds and wearing masks if we have to be in crowded places.

      Delete
  3. Hopefully blogger will allow me to comment this time. Our vaccination program has been a poorly organised debacle. Steps like those suggested would be an excellent start - though it doesn't address and couldn't capture some groups (the homeless and those on temporary visas without medicare cards for example). Neither does it prioritise essential workers but it would be an excellent starting point.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; I am annoyed at blogger on your behalf, it's unfair of them to discriminate like this. Have you changed to the new blogger yet? That might be why.
      I agree our program was and still is, poorly organised. one reason is the lack of enough doses, another reason is the blood clot possibility from the Astra-Zeneca vaccine. I have extensive varicose veins, so I'll be hoping to get the Pfizer vaccine when it is my turn. I'm not sure about homeless being without medicare, they may not have the actual card, but would they not be in the system from before they became homeless? Those that regularly get meals from centres that provide hot lunches would surely be told about the vaccines and where to get them? Well, I certainly hope so.

      Delete
  4. I worry about those who have no transportation which occurs here. Most the sites are drive through and won't take those who arrive by bus, then approach on foot. Your method would work for those sites that are inside buildings and accept walk ups. It would be easier for those without access to computers or even cell phones. Sadly I don't think there is any one size fits all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Arkansas Patti; walk ups are not allowed? That's discrimination. They, whoever "they" are, should realise that not everyone has a car and provide someplace like a church hall or school auditorium perhaps where people can queue up and get their doses. I remember many years ago, councils here in Australia had Town Halls open for people to get their babies vaccinated, I think the schedule was one day a month and I'd go in by bus with the baby, the pram, the toddler and queue up with hundreds of other mums.

      Delete
  5. I put my name down at my local doctor and I've been offered my first vaccine this week. It must be difficult for people who see a doctor at a surgery that isn't giving the vaccine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew; I've been thinking just this past week about making an appointment with my doctor instead of waiting. I'll have to phone and find out if he has the vaccine available. At least I could get my annual flu shot.

      Delete
  6. My state and county did a nice job. I'm glad I'm done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joanne; some states really got the ball rolling, while others played a hit and miss game. I'm glad you are vaccinated.

      Delete
  7. It would certainly be worth a try. Those who could not come at a time specified due to work or other problems might have to be given a chance to call and reschedule when they get their appointment time assigned.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. messymimi; that sounds like an excellent suggestion. another option, which I might just email my local MP about, is rolling vaccination stations, where vans go to work places and vaccinate all the workers, like the vans that used to go around to regional schools when I was very young, they had doors on both sides and we kids all lined up by classes and walked in one door, got our Salk vaccine and walked out the other door. If there was a needle involved with any other vaccination, that was given then too.

      Delete
  8. Getting my shot was quite easy. Since I am in health care line of work. I was second group to get a shot. My employer called and told us were to go on line and sign up. People with out computer or such is having issues.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dora; being in health care I knew you wouldn't have any trouble getting your shot. People without computers here will often ask neighbours or doctors for help. Some go to the local chemist and ask where and when they can be vaccinated.

      Delete
  9. Testing should be first, proper testing. They took off another product here due to the side-effects. It´s a shame a whole world cannot get a grip on "Corinna"!
    Distance. Sad as it is, stop hugging and kissing people you don´t know if they are "positive". And find out ... oh, it´s too long!
    Over a year we go on and on. So many people hurt, dead, so many shops and existences down the drain.
    How can we go to the grocery but nowhere else?!
    Just today I saw it again. Couples shopping together with a trolley each, how stupid!
    They bring back the trolley, rip down the masks and kiss cause they are a couple!! They share a bed and whatever! The world runs nuts. Without proper thinking... Sad. Bad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Iris Flavia; yes, testing is important, but with Covid there hasn't been enough time to properly develop the vaccines, that will happen as time goes on, but people are needing help right now. It's similar to the Polio epidemic that swept the world back in the 50s and 60s, far too many children were afflicted before the Salk vaccine was developed and used.
      The main thing to do, in my opinion is for Australia to stop bring people back here and for everyone to still wear a mask when in crowded places and still keep the two metre distance.

      Delete

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