Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Sunday Selections # 199



Welcome back to Sunday Selections!

This once-a- week-meme was originally begun by Kim of Frog Ponds Rock, as a way to showcase some of the many photos we all take, but don't get around to showing on our blogs.

The rules are very simple:-
1. post photos of your choice, old or new, under the Sunday Selections title
2. link back to me, River, somewhere in your post
3. leave me a comment so that I know you've joined in and can come over and see what you've posted.
4. hop on over to TheElephant’s Child to see more of her wonderful photos.

Andrew, Jacki K and Kakka often join in.

I usually go with a theme for my Sunday Selections and this weekI'm featuring one of my very favourite fence climbers:

Bouganvillea

common colours for bouganvillea are red, pink, orange. They are hardy climbers, some have vicious thorns, and all flower most profusely when the weather is hot and dry.
 
the coloured parts are the bracts, the actual flower is that tiny white bit in the centre.

usually plain creamy white, these flowers are striped. And a little blurry.

here is a section of the complete plant climbing about a foot higher than my head. 

As I continued walking across the street and around the block, I found a prettier, more delicate bouganvillea.

smaller flowers, slightly ruffled and two-toned, pink and creamy greenish white.

I love this and want one, but would it do well in a pot?

the plant was flowering very well,

and I noticed the ones deeper within had less pink and more of the creamy greenish white.

gorgeous

this one on the sunnier side has more pink,

while this one deep within the bush has no pink at all.

I'm very tempted to ask for a cutting next autumn.








 


13 comments:

  1. What beautiful flowers! Sniff, sniff... I'm not sure, but I think I can smell them from here. Sweet!

    (I didn't know the little white centers were the actual flowers.)

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  2. Beautiful bourganvilla but unfortunately we can't grow them here.

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  3. P.S. I guess I spelled it wrong but you know what I mean. Ha

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  4. Beautiful. I'd be tempted to see if I could grow one in a pot.

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  5. Such a glorious splash of colour. Love them. And a friend used them as a snake deterrent when she was living in the country - grew them all over her veranda in the hopes that those vicious thorns would prevent the snakes from scaling the veranda and coming into the house. A nice idea - but I have my doubts...

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  6. Bouganvilleas are wonderful...there's something about them that makes me feel happy and free...and they always remind me of the seaside. I say "seaside" because when I was a very little girl we lived at the seaside and bouganvillea grew out the front of our premises.

    There are so many lovely varieties, too.

    I hope you and Angel have a wonderful week ahead, River. Give Angel a cuddle for me. :)

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  7. There are some unusual colours there. I've seen them grow quite large in pots.

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  8. Beautiful, they can grow very large and wild. I read somewhere that you can reduce the number of thorns, but can't remember if it is don't prune or do prune lol.

    Thanks so much for sharing, and I hope you do get a cutting of that lovely delicate pink one.

    Hope Sunday is treating you well. xxx

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  9. Susan; I didn't notice any scent from them, but I have hayfever and can't smell anything much at the moment.

    Manzanita; they're for hot dry climates.

    Joanne; there are newer smaller varieties called "Bambino", suitable for large pots and even smaller ones called "mini" suitable for hanging baskets and cascading ground covers. I'll take my photo to a nursery and see if this pink&cream is one of the smaller ones, then I'll buy one if it is. I'd like to grow it over my windmill.

    Elephant's Child; I don't think a bouganvillea would deter snakes. Possibly a snake wouldn't climb through the thorns, but it could still slither underneath.

    Lee; there were quite a few growing in Port Pirie too, so seaside seems to be a good place for them as long as they're not too close to salty breezes.
    Angel is in trouble again. He has topped licking my nose and started biting it instead.

    Delores; yet they are so hardy. Tough even.

    Andrew; in pots with room to ramble they can get very large, but I don't have space for that so I'm after a smaller growing variety. The new "Bambinos" grow to about my height and the same in width.

    Kakka; I've seen very large ones almost covering a house and shed, they are spectacular when in full bloom. I'm going to a nursery next week to see if that pretty pink is available in the new smaller Bambino size.

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  10. Hi human, River,

    What a blooming marvellous bunch of photos. I love flowers and such vibrant colours. Nice to see considering most of the flowers in England are sleeping.

    Thank you for this, dear human.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny :)

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  11. Oh gosh River, now I am filled with envy - I love bougs! I have a miniature variegated one with white flowers and I tend to it lovingly, but with the HEAT and the drought here (er, yes I water it) it just looks sad and unhappy. I know how it feels, I'm sad and unhappy in the heat too! Lucky girl surrounded by all those healthy looking and colourful bougs!

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  12. Penny; how nice to see you here! I hope you're feeling much happier now. I like to put up photos of flowers and sunshine when you northern hemisphere dwellers are in the grip of cold and snow, it gives you all something to smile at when your own gardens are dormant.

    Rose~from OZ; can you move it to a shady side of your house? Onto a porch perhaps? Really it should be fine in the heat. Is it well established? More than a year old? Speak to someone at your nearest nursery to see what you can do to perk it up a bit.

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