Sunday Selections

As you all now by now, Elephant's Child is hosting Sunday Selections and I'm just randomly posting instead of weekly. 

Today's pictures feature the oleander bush at the front of the yard where I look out my window. 
Sometime ago, I mentioned the seeds that were blowing all over the yard in the gusty winds and several of my readers commented they hadn't known oleanders had seeds or even seed pods.
So here they are.

this is what the flowers look like, I can't find the photo I have of the bush in full bloom.

here it is minus the flowers and plenty of seed pods beginning to show

here is a closer look at the seed pods, which start green, turn yellowish and then brown as they dry

here is a seed pod just bursting open

poised for take off

ready to be blown hither and yon

so light and fluffy, and sneeze inducing

some didn't make it very far

landing within the leaves of the erigeron (seaside daisy) just under the oleander bush

and here's a few that made it all the way to my front porch where they were snared by a spider web

Hundreds are still flying from the bush daily, trying to catch up with the thousands that preceded them, but I think they'll finish soon.










Comments

  1. That is a beautiful flower! I've seen those seeds (and seedpods) flying around, don't remember where because I don't think oleander thrives around here. Nope, not here but one of the so many places I have lived have harbored oleanders!

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    Replies
    1. Grace; there are quite a few trees and shrubs with similar seeds and pods.

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  2. Lovely to see you joining us again this week. Oleanders are rare here. People uprooted them in droves because they are so poisonous.

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    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; I've heard the wood emits poisonous fumes when burnt as firewood, a few years ago an entire family died while trying to keep warm by an open fire with all doors and windows closed. I suppose the leaves and flowers would be poison also, but only if you eat them.

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  3. Very pretty, indeed.

    I hope the coming week treats you well, River...cuddles to the lovely Lady Lola. :)

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    Replies
    1. Lee; the bush in full bloom and seeds in full flight are very pretty sights. the Lovely Lady Loa is getting very spoiled with her cuddles. She's discovered the joys of lying across my newspaper getting scratched and brushed while I can't turn a page or do the crosswords. she used to get up after a half hour, but now I have to shoo her off or she would lie there all day.

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  4. It must be fascinating to watch those fly. Thank you so much for explaining about oleanders, i don't know much about plants.

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    Replies
    1. messymimi; it is fascinating watching several thousand drift across, but I do it from behind closed windows.

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  5. The seeds look like artificial flies used to catch trout.

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    Replies
    1. joeh; yes they do, I knew you would think that.

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  6. In the spring our cottonwood trees have the same frenzy of fluff filling the air. Other vegetation produces fluff, too, but cottonwood is the worst by far.

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    Replies
    1. Joanne; There are so many plants that produce fluffy seeds, to get them spread as far as possible I'd say. mother Nature at work. my daughter in the hills area has a cottonwood tree, I should ask if she would take a photo or two when the seeds are flying.

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  7. Thanks for showing the stages of those seed pods. Nature's reproductive strategies are amazing.

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  8. Love your photos.
    www.rsrue.blogspot.com

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    Replies
    1. R's Rue; welcome to drifting and thank you.

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  9. Hi River,

    We grow oleanders in the north too. Nice photos.

    :o)

    Cheers

    PM

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    Replies
    1. Plasman; thank you, they're a sturdy plant and grow almost anywhere, although falling out of favour because they are poisonous, especially when burning the wood, the fumes can kill.

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  10. The fluffy stuff sort of reminds me of what we call cotton wood.
    Coffee is on

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    Replies
    1. peppylady (Dora); yes, cottonwood seeds are also fluffy and fly in drifts of thousands at a time.

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  11. I learned so much about oldeanders here, thank you. All phases were so pretty and imagine them, so many, flying off like that!

    XO
    WWW

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    Replies
    1. Wisewebwoman; when the bush is in full bloom there are hundreds of flowers, with each one then producing a seed pod which in turn produces dozens of seeds, it's a wonder the country isn't over run with Oleanders. I suppose most of the seeds just die. I've never seen any little seedlings popping up around here.

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  12. And those pods are very bad for your dogs. Good to remember. Gotta pick those puppies up.

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    Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler; I did not know that. I don't have dogs but a couple of neighbours further down the street do, I'm sure they know the danger and I'm certainly not roaming the entire neighbourhood picking up fluff and aggravating my own hayfever.

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  13. Beautiful but deadly -- the oleander would make a good female nemesis to James Bond :)

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