Words for Wednesday

The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write, a poem, a story, whatever comes to mind.

If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along and read it.

This month the prompts are supplied by ME and can be found right here.

This week's prompts are:

1. peril
2. coral
3. sure
4. rocky
5. lampshades
6. furious immobility

and a photo from the time I walked this trail:

use all the prompts, or mix and match, just have fun with it.

Let the creativity begin!

Comments

  1. Replies
    1. only slightly confused; I know what to do with that one, the rest have me scratching my head.

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  2. Boy this one went fast, I surprised myself. Here's the link:
    Wisewebwoman

    XO
    WWW

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    Replies
    1. wiswebwoman; I'll be right over as soon as I answer the rest of the comments.

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  3. Getting to it this afternoon, thank you!

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  4. Coral looked at the steep and rocky hill ahead. She had choices. She could accept that her increasing mobility issues meant that attempting the walk would put her in peril, and give up. Give up before she stated, and go back to the senior's group busily beading lampshades that no-one would every buy or use.
    Be damned to that! she thought. Use it or lose it. If I don't at least make the attempt I am doomed to spending the rest of my life in furious (and bored) immobility.
    There is a bench half way up. If I get that far today I can sit, rest and admire the view.
    I think I can, I think I can...
    And I did. I am sure I can. And tomorrow (or the next day) I won't stop there but will carry on. The road goes ever on - and I am going with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; I love it and remember well the day I kept going just to sit on that seat and admire the view while I caught my breath. I suspect a lot of us will suffer the furious immobility indignity soon enough.

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    2. Nice one EC! It contains good advice to those of us who find themselves furiously immobile (or even a little bit less so) - keep trying! :)

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  5. My use of this week's words...

    What peril lay ahead was anyone’s guess. And what the hell did he mean by “furious immobility” …the words he shouted after her as she stormed from the house?

    The rocky outcrop was sure to cause problems. Furthermore, once out on the water, the coral reef was another hazard to be faced…and conquered.

    Maggie had had enough of all the unnecessary drama that had been going on all weekend.

    She felt very conspicuous in the hat her mother had made her wear. It looked like one of the lampshades in the overly-ornate lounge room! But Maggie didn’t care how ridiculous she looked…she just wanted out!

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    Replies
    1. Lee; a lampshade hat? Oh dear, what was her mother thinking. I get the feeling Maggie is better off out there facing challenges.

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    2. Echoing River. I suspect she will be much better out - and she can ditch that hat anytime.

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    3. Nice dramatic feel to this one, Lee!

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    4. I've known that wanting out feeling before!

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  6. Three times he had asked for a chocolate biscuit and three times I had casually said no. Now the edge in his voice startled me as he once again asked for, no, demanded "chocolate biscuit, NOW". I turned to see him red faced, eyes brimming with tears, small fists tightly clenched, his body stiff in furious immobility. This was new. My sweet, quiet Jacko, brewing a tantrum? but his eyes, something in his eyes, gave me pause and I reached for the biscuit barrel, took off the lid and held it out. He took two biscuits, one in each hand and turned away, walking into the living room as huge tears ran down his cheeks. I followed and watched as he climbed into his father's chair. He didn't eat the biscuits, just held them as he cried himself to sleep, whispering "Daddy." I felt awful and so sorry. I hadn't realised the biscuits I'd plucked carelessly from the supermarket shelf had been Steve's favourites. I hadn't known that Jacko would remember them. The funeral had been almost a year ago. I got Steve's lambskin jacket from the hall cupboard and tucked it around my sleeping boy, gently wiping the tear-stained face.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is one of your very best. Heart-breaking and so very real.

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    2. Thank you, it came to me in the middle of the night.

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    3. Oh! So lovely, River - yet so very sad. You know how to pull at our heartstrings!

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    4. Very moving, River...emotional on so many levels. Thank you.

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    5. Twilight; welcome to drifting and thank you.
      Lee and Cindi; thank you also, it seems I can't reply individually to you, there is only a 'delete' option under your comments.

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    6. Wow, you used furious immobility perfectly if very sadly. Painfully beautiful.

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  7. This week's words - best I could come up with, not much of a plot though! :)

    Coral sighed as she finished signing a pile of official forms. Her parents had chosen that pretty first name for their only daughter because, as her mother held the new-born child close, they were sure that their baby exactly matched the colour of mother's coral bead necklace.

    Coral's sighs, deep as they were, were not quite as heartfelt as in years past, at the start of what she called her years of "furious immobility". She had learned, slowly, to live with immobility brought on by advancing age and associalted infirmities. All, however, was not lost. She had retained, and polished, her artistic talents and acute sense of style. She had built up a thriving cottage industry decorating lampshades to order - subject matter and style to be chosen by the customer.

    Coral's thriving business couldn't make up for something she still especially missed - her Sunday morning walks along a rocky pathway from her isolated property to the village and its ancient Norman church. From the highest point of the pathway the distant shining ocean became clearly visible - Coral still profoundly missed this view .
    The Sunday morning radio now supplied Coral with a church service. She'd raise her voice in unison with the hymn-singing :
    "Oh hear us when we cry to Thee
    For those in peril on the sea".


    Her photograph album provided many visual memories of her beloved rocky walk, as did the painting on her own beautiful lampshade!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Twilight: This is lovely. Making the very best of her life, but still missing (badly) some things...

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    2. My response is similar to Elephant's Child, Twilight. This is lovely. :)

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    3. Twilight; this is very nice, I know how Coral feels, I enjoy walking the rocky paths and seeing the ocean and when I can't get there often enough I'm a very cranky person.

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    4. A lady who is NOT giving up...no way.

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  8. I wonder if people sometime set chair and day dreams.
    Coffee is on

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    Replies
    1. peppylady (Dora); I have sat on that seat in the picture and daydreamed while watching the waves, it's a beautiful peaceful area.

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