Wednesday's Words on a Friday

 

The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles. Sadly, Delores has now closed her blog forever due to other problems.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write. A story, a poem, whatever comes to mind.

If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along to read it and add a few encouraging words.

This month the words/prompts are supplied by messymimi and can be found here

This week's words/prompts are: 

1. bargain 2. outlook 3. belief 4. margin 5. differ 6. wagon 

and/or: 

1. outlet 2. glasses 3. modest 4. letter 5. social 6. lift

Here is my story:

“It’s my belief that a modest lifestyle is the best option for a long term outlook,” said Michael. “You see all these letters we get in the mail, with advertisements for the new shopping outlet, they have bargain after bargain, but how many of these things do we really need? People get conned into buying so much that they need a farm wagon to get it all home and having new things gives their mood a lift, but only for a while. Jason, pay attention here.” 

The small two year old boy put down the toy and focused again on his father. “My ideas differ from the social norm,” continued Michael, “but those who wear rose coloured glasses don’t see that a decent profit margin in their home budget is far better than the profit margin made by big companies. As you get older, I will teach you again and again and I will help you to build a financially stable future.”

As the key turned in the front door, Jason scrambled up from the floor and raced to greet his Mummy. “Mumumumum” he shouted gleefully as she held out her arms. Together they went into the kitchen and she poured him a glass of milk before unloading the groceries that Michael had now carried in from the car. “I gave him the speech again,” said Michael, “and I know he is too young to understand, but as he gets older we can have more discussions, with practical examples. I don’t want him to miss out on things his friends will have when he eventually begins school, but I do want him to know that he does not need everything advertised.”

“I know where this is coming from,” said Michelle, “and I understand. We worked hard to make this life for us and neither of us will ever be as poor as our families were, but don’t forget he needs fun too, and mistakes, he needs mistakes to learn from.” “Of course,” said Michael, “that’s where pocket money comes in. A percentage to be saved and the rest to buy what he wants whether we agree with it or not.”



Comments

  1. Kind of heavy for a 2 year old but pretty sure he will get the message and understand.

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    1. Arkansas Patti; he won't get it right away, but the conversations will continue and eventually he will ask questions and learn.

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  2. I grew up hearing very similar lessons. And it has certainly shaped the way I spend (or don't spend).

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    1. Elephant's Child; I grew up very differently. My parents lived from payday to payday and there was always a shortage of money, things were bought "on the book" and weekly payments were made but the accounts were never paid off. We kids never learned about money.

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  3. I like this. Always a cosy setting, this time even with an improtant lesson added.

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    1. Charlotte; I like cosy and the lessons are important although beginning a little too early. But that's often the best way.

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  4. Most of the advertisements we get go straight to the recycle bin. Unless I'm looking for something specific I don't even look at them.

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    1. Mike; same here for a long time. Now I have a "no junk mail" sticker on my mailbox, so I don't get them.

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  5. If everyone understood this, we'd have a better world.

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    1. messymimi; if everyone learned early too, so the understanding comes easier.

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  6. My mother always loved a bargain. It was a key feature of her outlook on life. In fact, it was central to her belief system. She recorded all of her purchases in a little notebook with coding in the margin that never seemed to differ. In 1972 she scribbled the word "wagon" followed by several question marks. I have no idea what it meant.

    Once I drove her to a discount outlet where she lost her glasses. They only cost a modest amount as the code letter "V" indicated. Mum's early family and social background was coloured by poverty and hardship. Sadly, she could never quite lift herself out of remembered habits when money was very tight and every penny, quite literally, mattered.

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    1. Yorkshire Pudding; truth or fiction? I record all my purchases in my budget book if I have used my debit card or ordered something online.

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  7. It's never too soon to start learning about managing money. However, too much repetition can sometimes have the opposite effect - I don't know, damned if you do, damned if you don't ;-)

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    1. jabblog; that's true about too much repetition, Michael will have to be careful and vary the information.

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  8. The more he hears it, the more it will sink in. Although that doesn't mean he will follow the advice. Of Hick's four boys, three are good at managing their assets. One is always scraping by. You can raise them the same way, but that doesn't account for the choices some make.

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    1. Val; that's a very good point, there's always a black sheep.

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  9. Ups, how did I miss this?! Great story again. My parents were the same and I´m not sure it was entirely right. I have a very hard time to be proud of myself even if I think I really did achieve something and be it such a simple thing as a tomato-sauce like yesterday - Ingo really loved it (I made it with butter this time).
    But I agree on what we really need. Ingo gets new toys all the time and with some he plays but a short while - drives me nuts.
    His parents were poor and now that he can afford it... he goes the other way!
    My parents.. I will not say rich, but decent, yet kids from war. I cannot throw away edible food - drives Ingo nuts. He says we can afford to throw away and buy new.
    Teaching a kid the right stuff is ... impossible?

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  10. Great story there. You impress me.

    December 23 was never an easy day. There were no bargains to be had at the Angel 2nd Hands. Even with such modest offering, Madison outlook was that she could find anything here. And there it was: a shiny red wagon. Next to it were dishtowels, crystal glasses, classic books, and all that anything else a grandma would enjoy. Piling all within the wagon, Madison skipped to her grandmother and handed her all the presents from her wagon. She reached into her jacket pocket, pulling out a handful of coin and a few raisins. “Here, Grandma! Just for you!” Madison beamed as Grandma smiled at the treasure. December 23 was okay, after all.

    Merry merry Christmas to you and yours!

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