Wednesday's Words on a Friday


The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write. A story, a poem, whatever comes to mind.

If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along and read it.

This month the words are supplied by ME and can be found right here.  

NEXT month, September, the words will again be supplied by Delores.

This week's words are: 

1. kitchen
2. long
3. modicum
4. notice
5. overly
6. perfectly

and/or:

1. quivering
2. roasted
3. strawberry
4. theory
5. umbrage
6. vestige

Here is my story:

In theory, someone who claimed to have never been anywhere near a kitchen, should not have been able to turn out such a delicious repast. The perfectly roasted potatoes, the succulent beef, tender greens and the delectable strawberry tarts waiting for their finishing touch, a dollop of whipped cream.

I had not been at all impressed with my previous two applicants for kitchen assistance. 

Vague, not-quite-there Dee-Ann, who assured me she had obtained all the required qualifications, yet seemed incapable of keeping her overly long nails trimmed or even clean, became a quivering jelly whenever I spoke to her about the mess she left behind at every step. Clearly not suited to taking or following instructions, (classroom learning is not the same as actual practical experience,) I gave her two weeks pay in lieu of notice and practically shoved her out the door. 

I suspected her qualifications had been earned via correspondence school, not through a teaching college. I sighed and placed the Help Wanted sign back in the window. 

Kevin, who came swaggering in announcing he could and would do anything and everything, took umbrage the first time I questioned his methods. I soon learned that he didn't just have a chip on his shoulder over past treatment in other kitchens, he had the whole damn  tree! 
It took everything I had to not show a single vestige of animosity as I showed him the door. And slammed it behind him.

Feeling a modicum of desperation, (Mrs Wicks wanted the kitchen up and running in time for Christmas), again I placed the Help Wanted sign in the window.

A small, delicately built girl, Michelle had initially come in thinking I wanted a dishwasher or waitress. "I don't know nothing about cooking, but i reckon I could learn," she'd said, then proceeded to surprise me, after only one week, with this stunning lunch menu now laid out along the counter. 


Comments

  1. " I soon learned that he didn't just have a chip on his shoulder over past treatment in other kitchens, he had the whole damn tree! " - Now that is a totally brilliant description.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace; thank you :) I know a few people who carry around half a forest!

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  2. We have all known someone with the tree on their shoulder. A tree which resists logging.
    Great story. And yay Michelle.

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    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; if only they could let go of their tree, they'd feel so much lighter. Thank you.

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  3. I liked the tree image also. Have known a few like that myself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Arkansas Patti; it seems we all know a few tree carriers.

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  4. For a little gal knowing nothing about cooking, the description of Michelle's dishes sure had my mouth watering.

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    Replies
    1. Val; michelle is one of those naturally talented cooks who just needed a kitchen to find that out. She probably goes on to become a great chef, or maybe just run a family friendly "home cooking" restaurant.

      Delete
  5. Luckily for the chef, Michelle is a quick learner. That tree line is priceless.

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    Replies
    1. messymimi; Michelle has a natural talent, some people are like that, while others, like us, are just happy to be the eaters. I love that tree line myself :)

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  6. Long nails certainly have no place in a commercial kitchen, that is for sure! And they certainly won't last long for very long!!

    Coincidentally, I've just had a couple of strawberry tartlets with my morning coffee!

    A very descriptive little tale, River...this week's words worked very well.

    Thanks for Wednesday Words this month. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee; thank you :)
      Some people insist on keeping their nails long even when the situation calls for short, I don't see how they can possibly get anything done. I haven't had any strawberry tarts in a very long while.

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    2. Not in the kitchens I worked in, River; they could insist away as much as they liked, but they'd not get anywhere with me regarding the desire to keep their long nails. The nails went, or they did!

      Actually, having long nails in a commercial kitchen is against health regulations. Fingernail polish and false nails are not allowed, for obvious reasons. Long nails aren't healthy, either...and if one breaks off and ends up in someone's dinner, it's not a good look...or taste! Dirt can be harboured under the nails, and they can be accidentally chopped of when chopping ingredients.

      But long nails don't last long in a kitchen, anyway, whether you want long nails or not. One's hands are continually in and out of water.

      Delete
    3. Lee; I was thinking of other places, like supermarkets where speed is necessary and so many girls had long nails they were afraid of breaking, so of course they couldn't scan and bag speedily. I'm sure there are other places where long nails just wouldn't work too.

      Delete
  7. Sounds as if you have some real life encounters with 'help.' I could relate to this little story!

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    Replies
    1. Sharon; no real life encounters here, I've never done kitchen work outside my own home.

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  8. Your writing shines in this piece! You do a great job describing the applicants, and like everyone else, I especially like that line about the tree, too. Great imagery.

    I think Michelle's success is a combination of innate talent and attitude. Humility and a willingness to learn go a long way, and it's is short supply in this world.

    Have a super weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan; thank you :) I like that tree line, I've used it in real life many times. You've nailed the Michelle character, that's exactly what I wanted to get across.

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  9. I reckon Michelle's a pretty fast learner!!

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    Replies
    1. fishducky; a fast learner with natural talent and a willingness to learn.

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  10. Well done with those words; there were some tricky ones in there this week. And now I want lovely, humble Michelle to get a promotion and a raise! And some strawberry tarts with whipped cream wouldn't go amiss right now, either . . .

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    Replies
    1. jenny_o; a week is a bit early for a promotion, but she does "rise through the ranks" eventually.

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  11. Glad to see you are still writing for WFW:-)

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