Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Friday, September 2, 2016

Wednesday's Words on a Friday



On Wednesdays, assorted people have been taking monthly turns at putting up a selection of words which is called “Words for Wednesday”.
We have taken over this meme from Delores, who had been having computer problems.
This month the meme continues here, at Hannah’s blog.

Essentially the aim is to encourage us to write.   

Each week we are given a choice of prompts: which can be words, phrases, music or images.   What we do with those prompts is up to us:  a short story, prose, a song, a poem, or treating them with ignore...
Some of us put our creation in comments on the post, and others post on their own blog.  We would really like it if as many people as possible joined in with this fun meme.
If you are posting on your own blog - let us know so that we can come along and read your masterpiece.
I’m hopeless at poetry so I always do a story.

It’s a fun challenge…why not join in?

This week's words are:
1. crocus
2. fount
3. shawl
4. torch
5. knife
6. narrative

There is also an image of ruins which I have not used. 

Here is my story:

Marian tucked the soft fleecy shawl a little tighter around the tiny body that no longer had any need of warmth.
She held the baby gently as she gathered her torch and a small knife used for gathering cuttings to increase her garden.
Making her way along the path to the fountain, Marian let the tears flow freely. 

Grandma had always said it didn't do to bottle up sorrow, to do so could make you a bitter person. "Cry it out," Grandma always said, "and talk it out too. Even if there is no one around, say the words you need to, it will help." 

Marian gently laid the baby in the grave she had dug earlier, in the soft earth of the flower bed surrounding the fountain. Covering baby Thomas was the hardest thing she had ever had to do; the tears flowed harder as Marian sobbed out loud. 

She marked the grave with a large flat rock, then used the knife to carefully dig up two of the crocus bulbs that were just beginning to show spears of green above the dirt.
These she replanted on the tiny grave, to bloom in spring, as she'd hoped her baby would. Sitting back on her heels, wiping the tears from her face, Marian began her narrative

"You were born on a stormy night, fragile, weak, and far too soon. I breathed life into your tiny lungs until you cried with the indignity of it. I held you close day and night, but you just weren't ready. You should have waited for the spring. I didn't know how else to help you, Grandma and your daddy were taken early in the winter with the flu; Mr Johnson from over yonder took them to the hospital in town and they never came home. I miss them so much. And now you are gone too. Only five days old."

23 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. fishducky; I don't now where this one came from, I usually write happy stuff.

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  2. Rip out my heart will ya?
    Such a sad story.

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    1. S.J.Qualls; sorry, couldn't help it. The story came all by itself.

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  3. Oh River. Starting my day with misty eyes here. Poor Marian. Grandma was so wise about talking things out - and will also be missed.

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    1. Elephant's Child; I almost cried myself. The wise grandma is from a story I read long ago, the rest is from who-knows-where.

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  4. So sad not to live longer than 5 days.
    Merle.............

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    1. Merle; born too soon in a cabin with no one to help.

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  5. Oh, dear! This is a sad way to end the week!

    Have you been taking lessons from Nicholas Sparks?

    Very sad...your description is excellent...well done. :)

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    1. Lee; I don't know where the sad came from, not my usual style at all. and now I have to look up Nichols Sparks, I haven't read any of his books.

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    2. Sparks wrote "The Notebook", "Message in a Bottle", "Nights in Rodanthe", "Dear John", among many others...and so many of his books have been made into movies...the names of both books and movies I'm sure you're very familiar.

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    3. Thanks Lee, now I know why his name is familiar. I haven't seen any of the movies, but I have heard of them.

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  6. Oh my.. You definitely stirred my emotions.

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    1. Granny Annie; I hope you had a box of tissues nearby.

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  7. You made me cry. Great writing. I love drifting through your mind. Hugs B

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    1. Buttons Thoughts; thank you, I often wonder what's drifting around in my mind. Mostly I have no idea until something pushes itself forward, as this story did.

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  8. Aw crap, girl. Way too sad. (But beautifully written.)

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    1. Susan; thank you. I don't usually do sad, but it's nice to know I can.

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  9. Another good story. Sadness always brings out the best of a great story. Love it.

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  10. Too sad for words! When you put "baby" and "death" together, I was already mourning for Mom and baby. Good writing!

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  11. For some reason, my comment disappeared. This story was a grabber. Put the words "baby", "died", and "buried" together and my chest tightened.

    I will hopefully post something at my sight on Friday. We just returned from a visit with family in Illinois. Still unpacked suitcases and boxes.

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    1. Susan Kane; thank you. Comments have been acting funny all over the place lately, hopefully they'll settle down soon and behave.
      I found it surprisingly easy to write a sad story.

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