Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Thursday Themes - Textures

Hi there! Welcome to this week's Thursday Themes.


Thursday Themes was thought of by Toni of Chick Chat fame.
If you'd like to join in, hop on over there and add your name to her link, after you've done your post on this week's theme, which is Textures.

Every week, Toni will post a different theme suggestion for us to have a go at.




Textures surround each and every one of us, from conception to death. Even in death, we are surrounded by the textures of our clothing, our coffin, and the earth that covers all.


Everything has a texture that can be seen and felt.
Metal, glass and plastic, all have a similar texture, smooth, hard, cold.

Many things, while sharing an origin, have a different look and feel, (texture), dependent on how the original product is processed, then treated.

Take fabric, for instance. The texture of a coarse canvas tarpaulin is so different from a soft fluffy blanket, very different again from the smooth silkiness of a satin ballgown. Yet all have the same cotton origin.


Compare the slight coarseness of a newspaper to the glossy smooth pages of a magazine.
Each is paper based, but the treatments used to produce them result in a differing texture for each.

The supple flexibility of new green leaves,

is very different from the dry, brittle texture of the same leaves a few months later, as they fall from the trees.


A few more examples:
Bread has a soft, chewy texture,

which becomes a crisp, crunchy texture when toasted.


Sugar begins as a liquid texture, squeezed from the fibres, (a fibrous texture), of the cane it grows in, processed to become the pale brown, dull crystals of raw sugar.
Processed further, it becomes the smaller, sparkly and finer textured crystals of white sugar.

Still further processing brings it to icing sugar, crystals so finely textured they appear to be a powder.

The semi-rigid nylon bristles of a toothbrush have a thicker, firmer texture,

than the soft flexible texture of a cosmetics brush.


Water has a liquid texture,

until you freeze it into ice-cubes. Hard, cold textured.


A plant can have several textures all at once.
A rose bush has smooth textured stems, with thorns, that have a prickly texture.
The leaves are glossy and smoothly textured,
while the petals have a soft, velvety texture.


Giant rocks.
In these we have two examples.
1. Eroded by wind, breaking down into stones, smoothed and worn down by water to become pebbles, which are smooth textured.
2. Mined by machinery, broken down into stones, crushed by machinery, to become gravel, which has a rough texture.
In both cases, however, the gravel and pebbles will eventually break down to become sand, a completely different texture again, crystalline, far removed from the giant rock it once was. Yet not so far, since a rock itself is nothing more than a giant crystal.

1. Pebbles.

2. Gravel.


The ridged texture of a brass lampbase,

contrasts nicely with the smoothly woven texture of its shade.


Take a look around you right now and see the many textures of the treasures that you have.
Close your eyes and feel the differences in the textures.
Then do a post of your own? And link back to Toni at Chick Chat.
Be sure to check back there in a couple of days for next weeks theme challenge.


















9 comments:

  1. WOW!

    River, I just LOVE looking at the world through your eyes. This is a FAB post. You've put so much thought into it, and it was a real pleasure to read.
    Thankyou for playing along -- I was quite ill last night and so didn't get the link up in time but it's there now.

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  2. This post is like Sesame Street for grown ups! I was reading as I was eating a late lunch, gnawing on the multigrains in my bread roll, automatically thinking, "THis is a chewy texture but the CANNED CHICKEN with ADDED SMOKE FLAVOUR THAT I BOUGHT OUT OF IDLE CURIOSITY AN HOUR AGO is a gloopy texture and I wonder what texture it'll be when it vomits back up again in an hour?

    Forgive my digression. Lovely post as always dear River.

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  3. Toni; It was fun to do. I took so many photos that could have gone up.....I tried to leave the link at your post, but the page isn't fully loading for me. I'll try again later.

    Kath; I tried that canned chicken stuff once.
    Erk! Not nice. I switched back to tuna quick smart.

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  4. I'm with Kath, Texture education I'd learnt so long ago had been forgotten in the misery of aging.... I wish I had've read this before I posted.

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  5. *ageing*
    Now I wish I'd proof read before I posted the comment, lol :)

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  6. Starfish; I'm surprised at the things I remember, since I didn't pay much attention to anything in school. Something I'll always regret. Proof reading! I wish newspapers and magazines still had proof readers on their staff!

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  7. I thought the close up of the chocolate on your next post was a good texture! ;)

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  8. I loved the way you showed the changing textures of the same thing! That's something I'd NEVER have thought of - and that's what I love about blogging!!!

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  9. What a great collection of images!!

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